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In weird Brazilian cave insects, male-female sex organs reversed

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - This may be the role reversal to end all role reversals. That's why I was really surprised to see the structure," entomologist Kazunori Yoshizawa of Japan's Hokkaido University said by email. Yoshizawa said that although sex-role reversal has been documented in several different types of animals, these insects are the sole example in which the "intromittent organ" - the male sex organ - is reversed, Yoshizawa said. Yoshizawa said the females of Neotrogla can hold male mates coercively using their gynosome.



In a cloning first, scientists create stem cells from adults

By Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - Scientists have moved a step closer to the goal of creating stem cells perfectly matched to a patient's DNA in order to treat diseases, they announced on Thursday, creating patient-specific cell lines out of the skin cells of two adult men. The advance, described online in the journal Cell Stem Cell, is the first time researchers have achieved "therapeutic cloning" of adults. Technically called somatic-cell nuclear transfer, therapeutic cloning means producing embryonic cells genetically identical to a donor, usually for the purpose of using those cells to treat disease. But nuclear transfer is also the first step in reproductive cloning, or producing a genetic duplicate of someone - a technique that has sparked controversy since the 1997 announcement that it was used to create Dolly, the clone of a ewe.



Scientists find Earth-sized world in orbit friendly to life

The discovery, announced on Thursday, is the closest scientists have come so far to finding a true Earth twin. The star's outermost planet, designated Kepler-186f, receives about one-third the radiation from its parent star as Earth gets from the sun, meaning that high noon on this world would be roughly akin to Earth an hour before sunset, said astronomer Thomas Barclay, with NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. "This planet is an Earth cousin, not an Earth twin," said Barclay, who is among a team of scientists reporting on the discovery in the journal Science this week. NASA launched its Kepler space telescope in 2009 to search about 150,000 target stars for signs of any planets passing by, or transiting, relative to the telescope's point of view.



Brutish and short? DNA 'switch' sheds light on Neanderthals

Hundreds of Neanderthals' genes were turned off while the identical genes in today's humans are turned on, the international team announced in a paper published online in Science. They also found that hundreds of other genes were turned on in Neanderthals, but are off in people living today. Among the hundreds: genes that control the shape of limbs and the function of the brain, traits where modern humans and Neanderthals differ most. "People are fundamentally interested in what makes us human, in what makes us different from Neanderthals," said Sarah Tishkoff, an expert in human evolution at the University of Pennsylvania, who was not involved in the new study.



Oh baby: Scientists find protein that lets egg and sperm hook up

If you really want to learn how babies are made, you need to know about Juno and Izumo. Fertilization takes place when an egg cell and a sperm cell recognize one another and fuse to form an embryo. Researchers said on Wednesday they have identified a protein on the egg cell's surface that interacts with another protein on the surface of a sperm cell, allowing the two cells to join. This protein, dubbed Juno in honor of the ancient Roman goddess of fertility and marriage, and its counterpart in sperm, named Izumo after a Japanese marriage shrine, are essential for reproduction in mammals including people, they said.



Wikipedia beats Google in helping researchers track flu season

By monitoring the number of times people look for flu information on Wikipedia, researchers may be better able to estimate the severity of a flu season, according to a new study. Researchers created a new data-analysis system that looks at visits to Wikipedia articles, and found the system was able to estimate flu levels in the United States up to two weeks sooner than the flu data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were released. The new system examined visits to Wikipedia articles that included terms related to flulike illnesses, whereas Google Flu Trends looks at searches typed into Google. The research team wanted to use a database that is accessible to everyone and create a system that could be more accurate than Google Flu Trends, which has flaws.



New Ragweed Allergy Pill Clears FDA
A new oral medication to treat ragweed allergies has been approved by the Food and Drug administration, the agency announced today (April 17). The medication, called Ragwitek (a drug from Merck and Co.), is a tablet taken once a day by placing it under the tongue, where it dissolves. Patients should start taking the medication 12 weeks before ragweed season, and use it throughout the season, the FDA said. The drug is an alternative to allergy shots or medications that relieve allergy symptoms, the FDA said.
Flight 370: Oil in Indian Ocean Not from Missing Jetliner

The ongoing search for the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner has suffered yet another setback, as officials confirmed today (April 17) that an oil slick discovered earlier this week in the southern Indian Ocean did not come from the plane. An Australian ship, called Ocean Shield, spotted the slick on Sunday (April 13), and investigators collected a sample of the water to try to determine the oil's origin. "Preliminary analysis of the sample collected by [Australian Defense Vessel] Ocean Shield has confirmed that it is not aircraft engine oil or hydraulic fuel," officials from Australia's Joint Agency Coordination Center, which is overseeing the search operations, said in a statement. "This expansion of the operating parameters allows the Bluefin-21 to search the seafloor within the predicted limits of the current search area," Joint Agency Coordination Center officials said in a statement.



5 Exoplanets Most Likely to Host Alien Life

Kepler-186f is a rocky world just 10 percent bigger than Earth. It's the outermost of five planets known to orbit Kepler-186, a red dwarf star that's considerably smaller and dimmer than Earth's own sun. This "super-Earth" is at least 3.9 times more massive than our own planet.



Scientists discover first Earth-sized planet that could support life

For the first time, scientists have discovered an Earth-sized alien planet in the habitable zone of its host star, an "Earth cousin" that just might have liquid water and the right conditions for life. The newfound planet, called Kepler-186f, was first spotted by NASA's Kepler space telescope and circles a dim red dwarf star about 490 light-years from Earth. "One of the things we've been looking for is maybe an Earth twin, which is an Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a sunlike star," Tom Barclay, Kepler scientist and co-author of the new exoplanet research, told Space.com.



Scientists find Earth-sized world in orbit friendly to life

The discovery, announced on Thursday, is the closest scientists have come so far to finding a true Earth twin. The star?s outermost planet, designated Kepler-186f, receives about one-third the radiation from its parent star as Earth gets from the sun, meaning that high noon on this world would be roughly akin to Earth an hour before sunset, said astronomer Thomas Barclay, with NASA?s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California. ?This planet is an Earth cousin, not an Earth twin,? said Barclay, who is among a team of scientists reporting on the discovery in the journal Science this week. NASA launched its Kepler space telescope in 2009 to search about 150,000 target stars for signs of any planets passing by, or transiting, relative to the telescope?s point of view.



Jaws, the prequel: Scientists find the 'Model T Ford' of sharks
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - You've heard of the Model T Ford, the famed early 20th-century automobile that was the forerunner of the modern car. Scientists on Wednesday announced the discovery of the impeccably preserved fossilized remains of a shark that lived 325 million years ago in what is now Arkansas, complete with a series of cartilage arches that supported its gills and jaws. Because shark skeletons are made of soft cartilage, not hard bone, finding anything more than scrappy fossilized remains of teeth and vertebrae is rare. Finding a fossil shark in an almost three-dimensional state of preservation, boasting important skeletal structures, is exceptional.
Oh baby: Scientists find protein that lets egg and sperm hook up

If you really want to learn how babies are made, you need to know about Juno and Izumo. Fertilization takes place when an egg cell and a sperm cell recognize one another and fuse to form an embryo. Researchers said on Wednesday they have identified a protein on the egg cell's surface that interacts with another protein on the surface of a sperm cell, allowing the two cells to join. This protein, dubbed Juno in honor of the ancient Roman goddess of fertility and marriage, and its counterpart in sperm, named Izumo after a Japanese marriage shrine, are essential for reproduction in mammals including people, they said.



Watch Live: Scientists Explore a Mysterious Deep-Sea World

This month, you can fly along the Gulf of Mexico seafloor and explore a strange ecosystem fueled by chemicals instead of sunlight, all from your computer. The journey to the deep sea comes courtesy of a remotely operated vehicle and camera sled that will send back live video to the Okeanos Explorer, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's research vessel. Scientists aboard the Okeanos are exploring the Gulf of Mexico's deep underwater habitats, which include mud volcanoes, methane seeps, brine pools, submarine canyons and shipwrecks. On the first dive, which occurred Saturday (April 12), researchers discovered oil and gas bubbles seeping from the seafloor near a large brine pool ? very salty water ponded on the seafloor.



Chilean Port City Fire Seen from Space (Photo)

Strong winds brought a forest fire into this port city of 280,000 over the weekend, NASA's Earth Observatory reports. An instrument on NASA's Terra satellite captured this snapshot of smoke from Valparaiso at 11:10 a.m. local time on Sunday (April 13). "One of the things that keeps coming out of my studies is that fire frequency tends to be highest when there's low to medium housing density and when homes are scattered in isolated clusters of development," Alexandra Syphard, an ecologist at the Conservation Biology Institute in La Mesa, Calif., told Live Science in 2013.




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evolution - Yahoo News Search Results
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M2M Evolution Conference & Expo Announces Agenda: Open to Every Company
TMC and Crossfire Media today announced the agenda for the M2M Evolution Conference & Expo, taking place August 11-14, 2014, at The Rio in Las Vegas, Nevada. The event caters t
Evolution explains facial hair trends
Brooks Hays KENSINGTON, Australia, April 16 (UPI) -- Beard trends follow an evolutionary principle whereby rare traits become more attractive, and scientists say we may have hit "peak beard."
The Story of the Human Body: Evolution, Health and Disease by Daniel Lieberma...
Why children should chew gum and why fruit juice is junk food: life advice from the barefoot-running advocate The effect the modern western diet has had on our health and wellbeing has been a rumbling issue for decades; it has become more controversial recently thanks to the influential evolutionary perspective on the subject . When the organic food movement began, the premise was that ...
Remembering Evolution's Impact on WWE and Projecting Its Reunion
Years after breaking apart and impacting WWE history, Evolution has reformed. The once-dominant stable mirrored the best groups of the past while creating two new stars. It is set to elevate emerging talent once more. Only this time, Evolution will transform its opponents into marquee names. Randy Orton , Batista and Triple H reunited on April 14, more than a decade after they first formed ...
The only shameful thing about sex is justifying outdated views with 'scie...
A study argues evolution is why women are more likely to regret casual sex. It ignores the cultural norms we're enshrouded in The "walk of shame" is a Sunday morning ritual on college campuses (and sometimes beyond) across the United States: young women, hair matted and still in last night's skirt and heels, trudge home post-hook-up. It's a uniquely female ritual, and the term itself evokes a ...
Evolution Must Add Young Member for Successful Comeback
Evolution: Any process of formation and growth.   Let this be a note to WWE decision makers, a young fourth member must be added to Triple H, Batista and Randy Orton 's alliance for this comeback run to be successful. Evolution is what got Orton and Batista to be believable stars. Now it's time to pay it forward. I like Evolution. They were a success when they were around and were a success at ...
Oakland City Mayor Welcomes Evolution Expo to Oakland and the Greater Bay Area
Evolution Expo, an event which will put the science back into science fiction and includes fun and stimulating programs for kids, continues to gain community support. Oakland City Mayor Jean Quan indicates, ...
Look who's evolving now: Using robots to study evolution
Scientists have demonstrated the usefulness of robots in studying evolution. They successfully used a colony of rodent-like robots to watch different mating strategies evolve. The work not only generated interesting and unexpected results, but it has also helped validate the use of robots in the study of evolution.
USB 3.0 SSD/HDD offer portable storage and fast transfer.
Supplied in aluminum enclosure, Evolution Series™ G-DRIVEŽ ev SSD and G-DRIVE ev external drive modules are bus-powered and help streamline 2K/4K video, photography and other digital content workflows. Portable G-DRIVE ev SSD module, offering 512 GB capacity, supports transfer data up to 400 MBps via USB 3.0 or 480 MBps via Evolution Series G-DOCK ev with Thunderbolt™. As 7,200 rpm ...
325-Million-Year-Old Fossil Reveal Jaw Facts About Modern Sharks
The discovery of an ancient shark fossil has revealed a unique insight into the evolution of the creatures and their extraordinarily advanced jaw structure. The skull of a newly discovered 325-million-year-old shark-like species suggests that early cartilaginous and bony fishes have more to tell us about the early evolution of jawed vertebrates?including humans?than do modern sharks, as was ...

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